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Difference between revisions of "Help:Writing Fact Sheets"

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(Created page with "== Notes == * Fact sheets provide factual information or pertinent points powerfully and succinctly, with little or no analysis. * A fact sheet may be about a person, plac...")
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Revision as of 07:58, 16 January 2020

Notes

  • Fact sheets provide factual information or pertinent points powerfully and succinctly, with little or no analysis.
  • A fact sheet may be about a person, place, thing or idea, such as a research study, or it may be in support of a stated assertion. See Oxford Study for an example of the former, and Grazing for an example of the latter.
  • A fact sheet is manifest as a top-level section within an article.
  • The information within the fact sheet section is automatically converted to plain text and can be copied to the clipboard with a single click of a button inside Share this page or by selecting text in the plain text section. For this to work properly, these conventions must be followed:
    • Under the fact sheet section, subsections are used to organize the fact sheet. Only one level of subsection is allowed.
    • If the fact sheet is to support an assertion, Assertion is the first subsection.
    • Under each subsection is an unordered list of facts. All content within the subsection must be in a list.
    • Sublists cannot be used under an item in a list. (This item is in a sublist, but it's not in fact sheet so it's fine.)
  • Each item in the list, except for the supported assertion, should be stated as an incontestable fact. Not "Chickens are smart," but "prominent animal neurobiologist Leslie J. Rogers says that 'the cognitive abilities of some avian species may actually rival those of primates.'"[1]
  • Information in sections outside the fact sheet section is not subject to the above conventions.
  1. Rogers, Lesley J. The Development of Brain and Behaviour in the Chicken. CAB International, 1995. 214.